The Macquarium Blog | Digital Marketing

Using Social Signals for Search

Posted by Sarah Sadd & Rebecka Wilson on May 16, 2017 9:05:00 AM

Earn the top spot on page 1 of Google search results and you’ve got yourself a competitive advantage. The top 3 positions on page 1 of Google search results account for 54% of clicks, with a 31% click through rate for the top spot. If you’re at the top, you can be sure your competitors will be coming for you, doing all they can to get a better position on the page while knocking you off the top spot. Mastering organic and paid search to improve online conversion is a marathon, not a sprint.  But what if you could get there faster – and secure your position more effectively? 

 

HubSpot’s State of Inbound 2017 report reveals that the biggest priority for 61% of marketers is growing SEO and organic presence on the web. And this isn’t just a priority for U.S. marketers – it was listed as the top priority across all surveyed geographical regions: North America, Australia & New Zealand, Asia, Latin America, Europe, Middle East, and Africa.

 

Being relevant in search has been a priority for brands and marketers since Google became a thing, but search is a constantly changing landscape. One survey respondent for the State of Inbound 2017 summed up the primary challenge: “Google makes a lot of changes to their search algorithms, and it impacts websites and SEO.”

 

To be relevant in search results, you need the structurally sound foundation of a high performing, well-architected website with relevant content, but you must also move beyond the foundation. Gone are the days when a strong website presence alone would guarantee you top page rankings. Now, to ensure you have a presence when and where your customers hang out online, you need a strategy that spans the digital ecosystem: engaging, relevant content amplified on a variety of social sharing channels.

Read More

Topics: Digital Marketing, Search, Branding, SEO, Social, Marketing Strategy, SEO strategy, Digital Strategy, Content Marketing

Understanding and Utilizing Cultural Context

Posted by Ira Gross on Apr 17, 2017 6:04:05 PM

In my last post I outlined a framework to improve cross cultural communication in the digital realm utilizing some of the concepts from the field of cultural anthropology.  In this installment, I will focus on the first construct that I discussed in my last post – cultural context. According to Edward Hall, the pioneer of this concept, a high context message indicates a rather implicit meaning, which is ‘either in the physical context or internalized in the person’, and little information is included in the ‘coded, explicit, transmitted part’, and vice versa for a low context message.

Read More

Topics: Digital Marketing, Design, Strategy, Copy, Branding, Cross-Cultural Communication

A Strategy to Improve Cross-Cultural Communication in the Digital Realm

Posted by Ira Gross on Feb 27, 2017 6:21:33 PM

A few decades ago Chevrolet had a much publicized failure rolling out their model the Nova in Mexico.  It turned out that “no va” means “doesn’t go” in Spanish.  Not really an ideal name for a car.  Years later in Italy a campaign for Schweppes tonic water translated the name into Schweppes toilet water.  Sales were unimpressive.  These two marketing blunders have become somewhat legendary in the annals of cross-cultural marketing and communication.

With globalization becoming a seemingly permanent element of our society, the importance of navigating the complicated maze that is cross-cultural communication is becoming more important than ever.  And not just to large global brands and firms, but to smaller organizations who through happenstance or necessity find themselves in the position of trying to sell their products and services to a broader, more international audience.  In the past, most firms simply translated their American (or home country) marketing collateral and message to their target countries language and called it a day.  This approach rarely yielded the desired results, but most firms lacked the know-how and wherewithal to do better. 

It turns out that there were several models available to try and optimize these cross-cultural marketing and communication issues, but they resided in a completely different field and hence were unknown to most marketers. The field of cultural anthropology utilizes multiple models to explain and understand communication among and between different cultures.  This field has identified that cultures have unique and different ways of looking at the world, varying attitudes towards accepted behavior, differing ways of expressing personality, and perhaps most important to this audience, different ways of negotiating and communicating.  Each of these differences affects the customer experience in unique and interesting ways and needs to be considered when a firm is branching out and attempting to do business with new nations, cultures and regions.

Read More

Topics: Digital Marketing, Design, Strategy, Copy, Branding, Cross-Cultural Communication

Ramifications of the Inverted Bell Curve

Posted by Ira Gross on Nov 3, 2016 10:20:05 AM

In my last blog post I introduced the concept of the inverted bell curve.  The ramifications of the inverted bell curve are many, but primarily focus on how it no longer pays to be “middle of the road.”  In addition to cultural affects like the hollowing out of the middle class, the inverted bell curve impacts sales and marketing as well as product development.  It is these areas I wish to discuss today. 

Marketers and Manufacturers

So what are the ramifications of this significant paradigm shift for marketers and manufacturers?  While there are not many, each is extremely significant in its own way.  First off, the mythical 80% audience simply no longer exists in most spaces.  Between the proliferation of television channels, radio stations, videos games, internet content and time shifting devices like TiVo, there is simply no one place where you can message such a high percentage of your intended target.  Which has led to the second ramification – marketers need to create multiple campaigns with multiple touch points in order to reach the same or similar audience.  And you can’t just put your television ads on your website.  You actually need to create different content with unique messages to reach these more siloed and stratified audiences.

Read More

Topics: Marketing Technology, Digital Marketing, Strategy, Branding

How Marketing Copy Improves Customer Experience

Posted by Rebecka Wilson on Sep 21, 2016 7:56:59 PM

Brands build and nurture their relationships with customers by paying a lot of attention to the customer’s experience across all touchpoints. I was reminded in a recent email, just how important copy and messaging can be in surprising and delighting the customer.


The messaging in a brand’s automated emails can be dry and boring, or it can used to endear you to the brand. A strong brand voice and marketing messaging strategy creates copy that not only informs a customer, but also entertains or amuses them, demonstrating that the brand understands their customers and wants to deepen their connection with them.

Read More

Topics: User Experience, Digital Marketing, Customer Experience, Copy, Email

The Age of the Inverted Bell Curve

Posted by Ira Gross on Aug 31, 2016 6:19:00 PM

I’d heard of the “bell curve” since junior high school.  At that time I knew it as a distribution for grades in a school course.  The middle of the bell curve ensured that roughly 80% of my classmates received a B or C grade.  In the left hand tail of the curve, students received a D or F grade and on the right hand tail an A.  Each tail represented about 10% of the class (please refer to Figure 1).

Read More

Topics: Marketing Technology, Digital Marketing, Strategy, Branding

The Most Valuable Word for Marketers in 2016 : USEFUL (How new behavioral economics research & user-centered design will impact your strategy this year)

Posted by Julie Hadden on Jan 20, 2016 7:11:59 PM

 

As we begin the new year, here’s a shout-out to a word that has held its own, humble and steadfast through all trendy buzzword storms. Let it lead us through the next 12 months as a guiding principle:

Read More

Topics: User Experience, Digital Products, Digital Marketing, Customer Experience, Research & Insights, User Centered Design, Behavioral Economics

Why Customers Love Stories

Posted by justin.reilly on Nov 25, 2014 9:28:37 PM

Every time I stand in front of a group of people to give a talk, I’m overcome with three distinct thoughts: 1) They have no idea what I’m about to say. 2) Find the person in the room who loves your talk the most. 3) And find the person who hates it.

Read More

Topics: Digital Marketing, Customer Experience

The Value of Qualitative Research

Posted by steve.perry on Nov 5, 2014 10:16:33 AM

Qualitative research is possibly the least understood type of primary research at most companies. In fact, most companies have never performed it before. If you grew up in the user experience or service design disciplines, you will likely be familiar with qualitative research and in-the-field ethnographic studies.

Read More

Topics: User Experience, Service Design, Digital Marketing, Customer Experience

How Less Data Drives More Revenue

Posted by justin.reilly on Oct 14, 2014 12:44:29 PM

"No great artist ever sees things as they really are. If he did, he would cease to be an artist."

Read More

Topics: Big Data, Digital Marketing, Customer Experience, Innovation